Interbrew's IPO

Published 01 May 2003
Reference 5106
Region Europe
Summary

During the Fall of 2000, while stock market conditions were rapidly deteriorating, Interbrew, the world's second largest brewer, succeeded an impressive 14.1 billion euros initial public offering on Euronext Brussels, raising 3.25 billion euros to refinance its recent 3.6 billion euros acquisition of UK's second largest brewing company, Bass Brewers. However, at the time of the IPO, the acquisition of Bass Brewers was still under review by the British Government. On 3 January 2001, barely five weeks after it had gone public, Interbrew was hit with the verdict that it had to dispose Bass Brewers to an approved buyer. The stock market reacted in state of shock, wiping out 4 billion euros or 25% in shareholders' wealth. This whole set of circumstances creates a unique opportunity for students to analyse the appropriateness of Interbrew's IPO, its timing and its offering price of 33 euros. The case lends itself extremely well to discussions on the following aspects on an IPO for a large privately held company competing in a consolidating industry: (1) what does going public involve?; (2) why do companies go public?; (3) when should companies go public?; and (4) how do you price the shares of firms going public?

Teaching objectives

The case lends itself extremely well to discussions on the following aspects on an IPO for a large privately held company competing in a consolidating industry: What does going public involve? Why do companies go public? When should companies go public? How do you price the shares of firms going public?

Keywords
  • IPO
  • Valuation
  • Financial planning
  • Financing strategy
  • Cost of capital
  • DCF analysis and multiples
  • Free cards flow
  • Market capitalisations
  • Multiples. AR2003
  • AR0203
  • RD0503